Well, it appears that Obamacare will pass and some deal has been cemented in Copenhagen. I guess we're getting what we deserve, namely a broke and destitute country. Good thing we're citizens of another kingdom, huh? But it kinda makes you homesick, doesn't it?

I don't know where Joe is.  I seem to be doing all the thinking and writing.

In the meantime, read this: [link]

I'll say more later.

 -Wesley

First of all, you know how Google always spices up their main search engine page on holidays; why didn't they do anything for Pearl Harbor Day.  Pinheads!

Nagato was a battleship of the Imperial Japanese Navy, the lead ship of her class. She was the first battleship in the world to mount 16 inch class guns, and her armor protection and speed made her one of the most powerful capital ships at the time of her commissioning.  She was the flagship of Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto during the attack on Pearl Harbor.

So what did we do with her after the War?  We used her as target practice for our newly acquired nuclear weapons.  She sunk after the second shot of Operation CROSSROADS.  And that is why I'm proud to be an American!

-Wesley

In math, you were always told, "well, you were told you cannot ____, but really you can."Mr. Owl

Lies, all lies!

Recall that in 1st or 2nd grade you were told you cannot subtract a larger number from a smaller number (for example 3 - 5 = doesn't exist).

Well, then you enter 5th or 6th grade and learn that you can.  The number is called negative.  But never take the square root of a negative number (for example sqrt(9) = + or - 3 but sqrt(-9) = doesn't exist).

However, you then enter 9th or 10th grade, and guess what?  You really can take the square root of a negative number.  You call this number imaginary, and give it the letter i.  For example sqrt(-9) = + or - 3i.  However, the square root function is okay.  BUT never, ever, ever take the logarithm of a negative number (for example log(100) = 2 but log(-1) = doesn't exist).

Or does the log(-1) exist?  Hmmm?!  Might need to go ask Mr. Owl.

We were taught lies growing up.  I believe it is my task to unveil these nasty lies.  The first lie goes as follows: 

 

“I before E except after C

or when sounded as A in neighbor or weigh."

 

The truth is this:

“I before E except after C

or when sounded as A in neighbor or weigh,

Or when it comes in comparisons and superlatives like fancier,

Or when the C sounds as “sh” as in glacier,

Or when the vowel sounds as E in seize,

Or when the vowel sounds like I in height,

Or when it appears in compound words like albeit,

Or when it is found in –ING inflections with verbs ending in e like cueing,

Or occasionally in technical words that have strong etymological links to their parent language like cuneiform and caffeine,

And in random and numerous other exceptions like science, forfeit, and weird.

 

And that doesn’t even rhyme.”  Editor of Merriam-Webster Dictionary

 

-Wesley

OK, I've been contemplating for quite some time whether or not to write a book. The subject of the book would be the parallels of Christianity and military life. And, now, I've determined that in one chapter I'll write about Day 1 in our heavenly home. I expect on Day 1, we'll run into our Father's arms just as these kids, who love their dads, have done. Enjoy! Oh, and buy my book when it comes out ... sometime.

Conservapedia Bible [Plain English translation: "Put your ignorance of the Scriptures online for everyone to see."]

Random thoughts:

  • Since the project's goal is to translate the King James Bible into modern English, I'm a tad disappointed the Apocrypha isn't there. However, I'm not surprised that this thinly-veiled KJV-onlyism avoids the subject of the Apocrypha altogether.
  • If you add something to the Conservapedia translation, document it. You'll want in on those royalties when it goes to print.
  • 80% of the stuff on this page makes my head hurt.
  • It is recommended at Conservapedia that "grace" and "peace" should be re-translated as "boundless generosity" and "tranquility," respectively. So while attempting to eliminate liberal bias in the translation, they've inadvertanly introduced what I'll call wussification. Seriously, what's wrong with "grace" and "peace"?
  • The writers of Conservapedia give as an example of the "liberal bias" of modern English translations the words "comrade," "laborers," "labored," and "fellow." No one is more conservative than me. And I say that those words are not liberal, just as the word "rainbow" is not homoerotic. They can't have those words. And they certainly won't get my money. Hear me, Zondervan?
  • This page is like a glimpse into a ***'s diary -- awkwardly ignorant.
  • Who in their right mind says, "You know what? Let's throw the writings and history of brilliant scholars throughout history to the wind and write a wiki Bible?" Nevermind. I pass those kind of churches every day. Disregard.
  • A Bible with political ties (Constitution Party, Phyllis Schlafly, Howard Phillips, etc): I want no part of it. "Are you for us, or for our adversaries?" "Neither."

Wesley: "Woman, I really like you.  Let's court."
Pretty Girl: "Well, with the feelings I have for you, I just see you as a friend."

 Just a friend?! (emphasis on just)  When did friendship become a lesser role?  Why is it that a girl I pursue decides that, while she doesn't want to be my girlfriend, she automatically gets to get the title of friend.  I have high expectations for my friends.  You don't just get to be my friend; you have to earn my friendship.

 If you just want to be a friend, join the other 347 people on Facebook who are just my friend.  So what is a friend?

Cicero says friendship is when individuals are perfectly honest and truthful.

C.S. Lewis says lovers share naked bodies and friends share naked personalities.

Both guys missed it.  Friendship is this: [CAUTION one slightly vulgar word is used]

By the way, I've created a new website called AcquaintanceBook.  Join today.

-Wesley

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Today, I read that President Obama won a Nobel Peace Prize for giving the world "hope for a better future." After dry-heaving for nearly an hour, I was reminded by the news story that it's time for our annual Messianic Peace Prize. And, for this one, I would like to ask for reader submissions. You can email or comment with a name or an organization and a description of why you think that person or institution deserves the prize. We will select the winner in the coming weeks.

In the meantime, let's review the past winners and the requirements. First, the requirements. From the first MPP post in 2007, Wesley wrote the following:

I am awarding this prize to the individual or individuals who share genuine peace.  The recipients must be marked by idealism and an aggressive crusading spirit -- messianic zeal.  And most importantly, they must have a true love for the Prince of Peace -- the Messiah.

In 2007, our first winners were Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Leggett for their work in Mauritania. In my mind, no one embodies the messianic zeal more than Chris Leggett. Chris was born in Cleveland, TN, and attended church there with his family. After a mission trip to Africa, he quickly decided that he was called to go to work among the peoples of the "Dark Continent." He sold everything -- everything -- he had and devoted his life, energy and family to his work in Mauritania. While his wife worked with women, and his children were homeschooled or sent to boarding school in a safer region, Chris taught language and computer science in the capital of Mauritania, just blocks from the central mosque of Nouakchott. And hundreds of projects and countless people benefitted from the micro-loans that Chris oversaw.

On June 23, 2009, Al Qaeda's North African branch claimed responsibility for gunning down Chris Leggett in the street outside his school building. He was martyred for his devotion to the people and his devotion to his faith. And his wife and children plan to continue the calling in Africa.

In 2008, we awarded the Messianic Peace Prize to The House of Courage and its founder Bonnie Skofield. The HoC is a safe home for unwed teen mothers, away from the slums and shelters with which many of the women who come to the home are accustomed. Ms. Skofield has designed a program for these mothers in order to train them and give them hope. And, in 2008, the first mother graduated from the program and is working in retail sales while living in a one-bedroom apartment with her child.

Unfortunately, it appears that Ms. Skofield was right when she said that most Christians say they are pro-life but really mean that they're pro-birth because The House of Courgage ministry has been temporarily suspended while looking for more funds.

These are two great examples of the idealism and crusading zeal that is required for this award. It is now October 2009 and time to award another. Got a recommendation? Email it to joe@steeplemedia.com, leave a comment or call me at my Google Voice number, 865.226.9210, and leave a message.

Prepare to weep: The Sunflower Boy [via]

 Then give this Virtual Museum of Iraq a spin. In it, you'll find Sumerian, Babylonian and Assyrian artifacts.

 

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