Tombola Ticket #12 Challenge!

Published 16 December 08 09:35 AM | Sandi

The winner of this challenge will be the person who can first list the greatest number of answers.

So if you think of 10 answers and post first, then no-one thinks of 11, you will win.

Challenge will be open until 9pm EST on Thursday, Dec 18, 2008.

Name as many icons as you can that give gifts of some sort to children on a special day! 

Please identify country of origin also if you can.

Must be legitimate names! Can be from any religion or country!

e.g. Santa Claus could be one, Easter Bunny could be another. 

You CANNOT go back and edit an earlier post by adding extra names. You will need to do a whole new post as you think of new names to add.

Comments

# j15bell said on December 16, 2008 09:32 AM:

La Befana:

a character in Italian folklore who delivers presents to children throughout Italy, similar to Saint Nicholas or Santa Claus.

Hanukkah Harry:

a fictional character created as a humorous response to Santa Claus. The character appeared in two skits on Saturday Night Live.

The Easter Bunny:

a mythic character who carries colored eggs and candy to children in a basket on the Easter holiday.

The Easter Bilby:

a local Australian alternative to the more globally known Easter Bunny.

Father Time:

Gives the gift of the New Year to the Baby New Year (a child for this list.) :)

Jack Frost:

Jack Frost responsible for leaving frosty crystal patterns on windows on cold mornings (window frost or fern frost) as a gift to children.

That's it for now.  I gotta go do my thing for today.  I did however find a list of Christmas gift-bringers around the world:

Europe and North America

A white Dutch woman as Zwarte Piet, Sinterklaas' helper.

Throughout Europe and North America, Santa Claus is generally known as such, but in some countries the gift-giver's name, attributes, date of arrival, and even identity varies.

   * Austria: Christkind ("Christ child")

   * Belgium: "Santa Claus", called Père Noël by French speakers and Kerstman("Father Christmas") by Dutch speakers, is celebrated on Christmas day;Sinterklaas for the Dutch speakers, Saint Nicholas for the French speakers is celebrated on December 6th and his a distinct character with a more religious, catholic touch.

   * Bulgaria: Дядо Коледа (Dyado Koleda, "Grandfather Christmas"), with the Russian-borrowed version of Дед Мороз (Djed Moroz, "Grandfather Frost") being somewhat more widespread in Socialist times from the end of World War II until 1989 and still in favour nowadays. Town of Velikiy Ustjug in Vologda region is proclaimed to be his prmanent residence.

   * Canada: Santa Claus (among English speakers); Le Père Noël ("Father Christmas"), among French speakers

   * Croatia: Djed Božićnjak ("Grandfather Christmas"), used to be Djed Mraz (Grandfather Frost - Serbian term) before 1990, Mali Isus ("Baby Jesus"), Sveti Nikola ("Saint Nichlaus") bringing gifts or rod on December the 6th

   * Czech Republic: Ježíšek (diminutive form of Ježíš ("Jesus"))

   * Denmark: Julemanden

   * Estonia: Jõuluvana ("Old man of Christmas")

   * Finland: Joulupukki ("Yule Goat")

   * France: Le Père Noël ("Father Christmas"); Père Noël is also the common figure in other French-speaking areas)

   * Germany: Weihnachtsmann ("Christmas Man") or Christkind ("Christ Child") (in southern Germany) bring the gifts on christmas eve; Nikolaus is celebrated on December 6th.

   * Greece: Άγιος Βασίλης ("Saint Basil")

   * Hungary: Jézuska or Kis Jézus ("child Jesus"); note that Mikulás ("Nicholas" as Santa Claus) has a separate feast day earlier (6th of Dec), puts candy in kids' boots (which are to be polished and put in the window), but Mikulás is never involved in Christmas.

   * Iceland: Jólasveinar. In Icelandic folktales, there are 13 Santa Clauses.

   * Ireland: Daidí na Nollag ("Father Christmas") among Irish speakers

   * Italy: Babbo Natale ("Father Christmas"), sometimes substituted by Gesù bambino ("Baby Jesus"), in order to give to this gift-bringing character a more catholic connotation. On the Epiphany, Jan 6th, La Befana, a very old lady who rides a broomstick brings candies and sweeties to children, and she puts them into the socks the children have prepared for her (and traditionally hung near the fireplace). In Trieste, because of Slovenian and Croatian influences, Saint Nicholas is also celebrated on the 6th December.

   * Latvia: Ziemassvētku vecītis

   * Liechtenstein: Christkind

   * Lithuania: Kalėdų Senelis

   * Luxembourg: Klaussenhofer

   * Macedonia: Dedo Mraz

   * Netherlands "Santa Claus", called Kerstman ("Christmas Man"), is recently celebrated by some people on Christmas day; Sinterklaas is celebrated on December 5th.

   * Norway: Julenissen

   * Poland: Święty Mikołaj / Mikołaj ("Saint Nicholas")

   * Portugal: Pai Natal ("Father Christmas")

   * Romania: Moş Crăciun ("Old Man Christmas")

   * Russia: Дед Мороз (Ded Moroz, "Grandfather Frost")

   * Scotland: Bodach na Nollaig (Scots Gaelic: Old Man of Christmas)

   * Serbia: Deda Mraz (Деда Мраз - Grandfather Frost) - renamed from Božić Bata (Божић Бата - Christmas Brother) during the communist times after the World War II and moved from Christmas to New Year to prevent any religious connections

   * Slovakia: Ježiško (Refers to newborn(baby) Jesus); note that Mikuláš ("Nicholas" as Santa Claus) has a separate feast day earlier (6th of Dec), puts candy in kids' boots (which are to be polished and put in the window), but Mikuláš is never involved in Christmas

   * Slovenia: Bozicek

   * Spain: Papá Noel (Father Noel); the Tió de Nadal in Catalonia; Olentzero in the Basque Country. A more common and traditional Christmas present-giving figure in Spain are "Los Reyes Magos" ("The Three Kings"; "Magi").

   * Sweden: Jultomten ("The Yule/Christmas Gnome")

   * Switzerland: Christkind

   * Turkey: Noel Baba ("Father Noel") Also, Noel Baba is widely thought to bring new year presents in Turkey due to the country's predominant Muslim population. Christmas is celebrated among the Christian communities.

   * United Kingdom: Santa Claus, also known as Father Christmas though they were originally two quite different people, and Father Christmas did not originally bring gifts

   * United States: Santa Claus; Kris Kringle; Saint Nicholas or Saint Nick

   * Wales: Siôn Corn

Latin America

Santa Claus in Latin America is generally referred to with different names from country to country.

   * Argentina: Papá Noel, El Niño Dios

   * Brazil: Papai Noel

   * Chile: Santa Claus is called "Viejito Pascuero" (Old man Christmas)

   * Colombia: El Niño Dios ("God child"), Papa Noel

   * Costa Rica: San Nicolás or Santa Clos

   * Dominican Republic: Santa Clos/Papá Noe

   * Ecuador: El Niño Dios ("God child"), Papá Noel

   * Mexico: Santa Claus (pronounced "Santa Clos"); El Niño Dios ("God child," in reference to Jesus) and also Los Tres Reyes Magos.

   * Peru: Papá Noel

   * Puerto Rico: Jesús (Christmas, Los Tres Reyes Magos (The Three Kings Day), Santa Clos.

   * Venezuela: Niño Jesús ("child jesus"); San Nicolás ("Santa"). Depends on the region.

East Asia

People in East Asia, particularly countries that have adopted Western cultures, also celebrate Christmas and the gift-giver traditions passed down to them from the West.

   * China: 圣诞老人

   * Hong Kong: 聖誕老人 (literally 'The Old Man of Christmas')

   * Indonesia: Santa Claus or Sinterklas

   * Japan: サンタクロース (Santa Kuroosu, or Santa-san)

   * Korea: 산타 클로스 (Santa Harabeoji, or "Grandfather Santa")

   * Philippines: Santa Claus

   * Taiwan: 聖誕老人 or 聖誕老公公 (both literally 'The Old Man of Christmas')

   * Thailand: ซานตาคลอส (Santa Claus)

   * Vietnam: Ông Già Nô-en (literally 'The Old Man of Christmas')

Central Asia

   * India: ಸಾ೦ಟಾ ಕ್ಲಾಸ್ (in southern India)

   * Tatarstan: Qış Babay/Кыш Бабай (Winter Grandfather)

   * Uzbekistan: Qor Bobo (Snow Grandfather)

Africa and the Middle East

Christians in Africa and Middle East who celebrate Christmas generally ascribe to the gift-giver traditions passed down to them by Europeans in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Descendants of colonizers still residing in these regions likewise continue the practices of their ancestors.

   * Egypt: Baba Noel

   * Iran: Baba Noel

   * Israel: סנטה קלאוס (Santa Claus in Hebrew letters; note that most of the population in Israel is Jewish and does not recognize the entity known as 'Santa Claus')

   * South Africa: Sinterklaas; Father Christmas; Santa Claus

Oceania

   * Australia: Santa Claus and Father Christmas.

   * New Zealand: Santa Claus

# fleur_de_lis said on December 16, 2008 10:31 AM:

I was going to say the Tooth Fairy, but I give up!

# Sandi said on December 16, 2008 01:33 PM:

Holy Cow J15! That's quite a list! Wonder if anyone can top that!

# j15bell said on December 16, 2008 01:42 PM:

LOL fleur!!!

Don't give up quite yet.  I gave 5 plus the santa's.

Besides I think you can name what I did plus add ones to up your count.

c'mon.  play!!! :)

# fleur_de_lis said on December 16, 2008 04:09 PM:

Ok j15, I see your 5 plus the Santa's and raise you a tooth fairy (give you money in exchange for teeth) and a leprechaun (give you a pot of gold when you catch him)...

# j15bell said on December 16, 2008 06:22 PM:

hmmmmmmmmmm......................

interrogate a leprechaun for its money

nah!  

I'll give you two sticks of gum for the tooth fairy and you can keep the little pink arsed gold grubbing squirt.  I'm the tallest person on my side of a third generation irish family.  At 5'4" living with a 6'6" hubby, 6'3" 17 year old son and a 6' adult daughter.  I don't need to be achasin such a teenie little one.  I've heard what they can do to ya! =0

Which reminds me!!!!

La Befana:

a character in Italian folklore who delivers presents to children throughout Italy, similar to Saint Nicholas or Santa Claus.

Hanukkah Harry:

a fictional character created as a humorous response to Santa Claus. The character appeared in two skits on Saturday Night Live.

The Easter Bunny:

a mythic character who carries colored eggs and candy to children in a basket on the Easter holiday.

The Easter Bilby:

a local Australian alternative to the more globally known Easter Bunny.

Father Time:

Gives the gift of the New Year to the Baby New Year (a child for this list.) :)

Jack Frost:

Jack Frost responsible for leaving frosty crystal patterns on windows on cold mornings (window frost or fern frost) as a gift to children.

ALL THOSE SANTA'S

The tooth fairy that fleur mentioned.

Little Christmas:

Celebrated by Irish families as far as I know.  It's when the tree comes down but in the morning children will come down and find one gift for everyone to share given by the Three Magi.  Thus The Gift of the Maji.  aka Little Womens Christmas where the lady of the house is relieved of all her duties for the day.

# fleur_de_lis said on December 16, 2008 06:31 PM:

Alright, so you're going to be that way! I will see your 5, your Santas, the Tooth Fairy, and Little Christmas, and throw in The Gingerbread Man (give you a run for your money until you catch him and eat him) instead of the leprechaun.

# j15bell said on December 16, 2008 06:46 PM:

I can't remember did he do well in that movie with the ogre?

which reminds me:

God bless us, everyone!

Shrek the halls with boughs of holly, Fa la la la la la la la!

'Tis the season to be jolly, Fa la la la la la la la!

Don we now our gay apparel, Fa la la la la la la la!

Troll the ancient Yuletide carol, Fa la la la la la la la!

See the blazing Yule before us, Fa la la la la la la la!

Strike the harp and join the chorus, Fa la la la la la la la!

Follow me in merry measure, Fa la la la la la la la!

While I tell of Yuletide treasure, Fa la la la la la la la!

Fast away the old year passes, Fa la la la la la la la!

Hail the new, ye lads and lasses, Fa la la la la la la la!

Sing we joyous all together! Fa la la la la la la la!

Heedless of the wind and weather, Fa la la la la la la la!

Fa la la la la la la la!

Fa la la la la la la...

~Ginger Bread Man

# fleur_de_lis said on December 16, 2008 08:11 PM:

Okay, how about the Great Pumpkin from Charlie Brown--leaving gifts for kids on Halloween.

...And let us not forget Frosty the Snowman giving kids the gift of fun and play on the first snowfall.

# Sandi said on December 16, 2008 09:22 PM:

Oooo the battle is heating up! Anyone else getting in on this?

# j15bell said on December 16, 2008 11:07 PM:

La Befana

Hanukkah Harry

The Easter Bunny

The Easter Bilby

Father Time

Jack Frost

All them Santa's

Tooth Fairy

The Maji and Little Christmas

The Leprechaun dude

Gingerbread Man

Great Pumpkin

Frosty the Snowman

The most important iconic people in a child's life.  Mom and Dad giving gifts on the childs birthday.

Then there is Festivus for the rest of us!!

# j15bell said on December 16, 2008 11:08 PM:

La Befana

Hanukkah Harry

The Easter Bunny

The Easter Bilby

Father Time

Jack Frost

All them Santa's

Tooth Fairy

The Maji and Little Christmas

The Leprechaun dude

Gingerbread Man

Great Pumpkin

Frosty the Snowman

The most important iconic people in a child's life.  Mom and Dad giving gifts on the childs birthday.

Then there is Festivus for the rest of us!!

# j15bell said on December 16, 2008 11:09 PM:

this just may end up a YO MAMMA shout out competition! ;)

# fleur_de_lis said on December 17, 2008 10:59 PM:

Okay, I've been saving my trump card for the final showdown! Johnny Appleseed--giving kids and adults alike the gift of fruit trees.

# j15bell said on December 18, 2008 01:58 PM:

how about these peeps...............

Fairy: Small creatures that bestow gifts on newborn children. Never seen by humans.

Sprite: Sprites are water creatures. They are found only in places where it is serene and cool. They like to play with nymphs or torment butterflies. Sprites have one very important job, which is going around and changing the colors of a tree's leaves in Autumn for children and their families to enjoy.

# fleur_de_lis said on December 19, 2008 04:15 PM:

Drats j15! I still had Robin Hood and unicorns in my arsenal...but congrats, looks like you had the last one. Oh well, I guess they wouldn't fit the game criteria anyway:(

# Sandi said on December 19, 2008 10:15 PM:

Yes, I think it's pretty clear - j15bell is our winner for this challenge! Nice work j15! You educated me along the way as well!

Now to get to lucky #13 ticket challenge....